99 Days (Kate Cotugno, 2015)

99-days

Guys, I read a book!  I feel like this is newsworthy since it’s been forever….

Why did you choose this book?

This was one of the first ARCs (Advance Reader’s Copies) I picked up in my last job.  It’s a little sad that I’m just now getting around to reading it.

What’s it about?

Molly made a mistake during her junior year – sleeping with her boyfriend’s brother.  She kept the secret for a year, until her mom’s next novel was published, revealing all of the gritty details to everyone in town.  After a year away at boarding school, Molly just has to survive the summer back home.  It’s only 99 days.

Categories

Teen, fiction

Review

This book helped to pull me out of a reading slump (hence why I haven’t blogged since June).  I read it over the course of two evenings, and found it pretty enjoyable.  The book is structured with each chapter as one of the 99 days, some with less than a page of text and others of “normal” chapter length.  I made the mistake of reading some Goodreads reviews halfway through, which I think unfairly colored my perception of the remainder of the book.  Molly definitely made some mistakes and was kind of whiny, but I found the book to be fine for some fun light reading.  Patrick, however, escaped too unscathed.

Refresher (here there be spoilers)

No really, this is a book summary/plot synopsis

Ok, I warned you…

In essence, Molly gets a job at a hotel and befriends her ex-boyfriend’s (Patrick) new girlfriend, Tess.  Patrick’s brother Gabe has been falling for Molly for most of their lives (he’s also the one she slept with), and he starts dating her again.  Molly is constantly bullied by Patrick’s twin, Julia, who becomes much nicer after Molly discovers she’s a lesbian.  However, Patrick can’t resist Molly’s charms (he’s kind of a jerk) and starts fooling around with her whenever he can.  He sneaks into her house to have sex for the first time, but upon realizing that Molly went all the way with Gabe, becomes irate with her and spills the truth about what they’ve been doing together all summer.  Just as everything is coming together for Molly, it all falls apart again, except this time not even Gabe is her ally.  Luckily, by this point the 99 days are over and Molly is off to college to bond with her new roommate Roisin, who has also had a summer filled with boyfriend drama.  Talk about a roller coaster ride of a novel – I think Molly had the ambiguous ending she deserved, but I think Patrick needed to be impacted by more of the fallout.

Hot Attraction (Lisa Childs, 2016)

hot attraction

Why did you choose this book?

I’m trying to read through a variety of Harlequins to get a sense of the differences between imprints.  So far I’ve tried Special Edition, Presents, and Blaze.  I didn’t review the Special Edition but suffice it to say it was a little too bland and cheesy for me.  My favorite so far is Presents.

What’s it about?

Reporter Avery Kincaid is looking for a story while spending some time in her hometown.  Elite Hotshot firefighter Dawson Hess is putting out forest fires, saving lives, and trying to keep to himself.  After he rescues Avery’s nephews from a fire, he’s on her radar and she won’t let him get away without giving her a scoop!

Categories

Harlequin Blaze, romance

Other recommended reads?

Besides the other entries in this series?  I would try authors known for their steamy romance like Maya Banks or Lora Leigh.

Review

My favorite is still Presents, of the Harlequins I’ve tried so far.  This one was mostly romance and not much plot, which I guess is why you read a Blaze in the first place.  My major issue is that the plot revolves around an arsonist (who tries to kill Avery multiple times), yet no one investigates to determine the arsonist’s identity.  He or she is still unknown at the end of the book.  Unless they unveil the arsonist in another volume of the Hotshot Heroes series, I feel that’s a very unsatisfying conclusion.  I also thought it was unrealistic for Dawson to remain on that Hotshot team after his past is revealed.

Up next?

We have two choices:

Dead Presidents by Brady Carlson

Devoured by Sophie Egan

 

Passenger (Alexandra Bracken, 2016)

passenger.jpg

Why did you choose this book?

Partially for the premise, but primarily for the cover.  So stunning!

What’s it about?

Teenage Etta steps onto the stage at the Met for her first solo violin performance with a full orchestra.  As she begins to play, she is interrupted by overwhelming feedback only she can hear.  Another musician grabs her and pushes her through a portal, where she awakens in a ship’s cabin with a frantic battle and roaring cannon fire overhead.  To give you the basic premise, the head of the travelers is a ruthless grandfather-type-figure who is holding Etta’s mother hostage and will harm her unless Etta returns in a week with an astrolabe that can be used to further his power.

Bracken has a fascinating premise in these books.  Essentially, there were four families of “travelers” who could use passages throughout the world to travel through both time and space.  These four families have now been consolidated into one under the power of “Grandfather.”  The passages are an intriguing idea.  The passage in the Met of 2015 leads to 1776 Nassau.  Passages only connect two times and places, however, so to get to, say, mid-1500s Damascus, travelers would have to take multiple specific passages.  It’s mind-boggling, especially because travelers have to keep track of their movements to avoid crossing paths with themselves.

Categories

Fantasy, teen, time travel

Other recommended reads?

Although it doesn’t have daemons, the portals in this book reminded me of those in Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials series.

Review

I started to lose interest toward the end, but it’s a smart and engaging fantasy.  I appreciated the fact that there were no magical powers and the passages were the only fantastical element.  It was also an intelligent read for teenagers and didn’t over-simplify, though I certainly wish that the characters had spent more time getting immersed in many of the eras to which they traveled.  The second book is due out next year and is entitled Wayfarer.

Up next?

Hot Attraction by Lisa Childs

Funny Girl (Nick Hornby, 2015)

funny girl

Why did you choose this book?

A short, sweet answer: July Fiction Book Discussion Pick!

What’s it about?

Barbara from Blackpool is determined to become the next Lucille Ball.  She turns down the title of Miss Blackpool and heads to London, where a chance encounter with an agent and a lucky break at casting lead to a sitcom that makes her a national idol.

Categories

Fiction, beach read, British humor

Other recommended reads?

Other Hornby books.  He’s written several and has a very unique writing style, of which I just can’t get enough!

Review

I liked this much more than I expected to.  The book isn’t completely about the female protagonist, but also her male co-star, her shy and sweet producer, and the pair of writers struggling in marriages of different sorts.  I liked all of the supporting characters (except maybe Bill – he was quite gruff), and I’m sure that I failed to understand some of the distinctly British humor, but it was an enjoyable, quick read that I devoured over Independence Day weekend (I’m a bit behind on posting, I know).  I’m now inspired to try some of Hornby’s other books.  I also really liked the format.  It was separated into chapters by the series of the TV show, and after the show ended, it skipped several decades and provided a fitting and satisfying epilogue.

Up next?

Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

The View from the Cheap Seats: Selected Nonfiction (Neil Gaiman, 2016)

cheap seats

Why did you choose this book?

I’ve been meaning to read Gaiman for quite some time now, and my favorite yearly reading challenge asked for a collection of essays.  This seemed as good an option as any, though I did fail to realize it was over 500 pages long until after picking it up from the library.

What’s it about?

It is, most simply, a collection of written speeches and essays by a well-known author.  Most have to do with art, comics, literature, film, and other authors.

Categories

Nonfiction, essays

Other recommended reads?

Probably authorial memoirs.  The one jumping to mind is In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri and Ann Goldstein, though I can’t say why exactly.

Review

My interest in these pieces waned and waxed in accordance with the topic of each section.  I certainly learned a few new things, and if I wasn’t interested in the topic, it was nice that the pieces were fairly short and diverse.  There was one anecdote that cracked me up completely.  Gaiman recounts his experience at the Oscars, when he was in line behind a woman in a beautiful watercolor dress (Rachel McAdams).  Someone stepped on her dress.  She stopped for a photo, and he used the time to inspect her dress for footprints.  Much to his surprise, a photo of her graced the cover of The Guardian, with him front and center, staring at her dress in rapt concentration.

Up next?

Funny Girl by Nick Hornby

The Infidel Stain (MJ Carter, 2016)

infidel stain

First, an announcement!  The blog has been online for a full year now.  Thank you to everyone who reads these posts and follows the blog.  Now, onward to more biblioventuring!

Why did you choose this book?

I won this book from a Goodreads First Reads giveaway, in audiobook format.

What’s it about?

Blake and Avery were comrades in the British military during the occupation of India.  This is the second novel in the series, and I did not read the first, entitled The Strangler Vine.  Blake works as a private inquiry agent and dons various disguises to investigate a variety of crimes.  Avery has settled into domestic life, with his wife expecting their first child at their country estate.  The two are reunited to dig into the matter of a pair of printers, grotesquely murdered and arranged very specifically over their presses.

Categories

Historical mystery, London, 1800s

Other recommended reads?

This is a harder question for me, since I don’t typically read mysteries involving a pair of detectives.  The best British historical mystery I’ve read lately was A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourn, which may be one of the best books I’ve read this year.

Review

Admittedly, my perspective of this book may be a bit different since I listened to it, rather than reading it.  That being said, I struggled with understanding the narrator at points and found some of his accents rather odd.  More importantly, this was a novel that involved an extremely large quantity of dialogue and rather less action and investigation.  A very “talky” mystery.  A good read, but not one of those you are compelled to finish in one sitting.

Up next?

The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

Pax (Sara Pennypacker, 2016)

pax

Why did you choose this book?

It’s an adorable novel about a fox!  What more need I say?  Those of you who read my review of Tor Seidler’s Firstborn know that I have a thing about books told from the perspective of a dog/wolf/fox.

What’s it about?

Peter’s father is headed to war and sends Peter to live with his grandfather until the fighting is over.  Peter’s father forces Peter to turn his pet fox, Pax, loose in the woods.  Chapters alternate between the perspectives of Peter and Pax.  Peter runs away from his grandfather’s house, trying to travel the hundreds of miles back to Pax.  Pax runs into a pack of foxes and tries to learn to survive in the wild.

Categories

Juvenile fiction

Other recommended reads?

I know this one is old, but one of my favorite books from childhood was Child of the Wolves by Elizabeth Hall.  The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford is also a good one.

Review

I was expecting this book to be a real tear-jerker with a heartbreaking conclusion.  I read it in one sitting, being completely sucked into the story.  But I didn’t shed a single tear.  I loved Pax and wanted the best for him, but Peter struck me as overly whiny and self-centered.  I also was bothered by the unspecific setting.  It was wartime, but when and where?  We don’t know.  Definitely a cute read, recommended for animal lovers.  It’s a little unique because the portions told from Pax’s point of view don’t tell the reader his thoughts, like many other books with this sort of perspective do.  It is also difficult for adult readers to believe, since no one seemed to try to find Peter during the weeks he was gone.

Up next?

The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman or The Infidel Stain by MJ Carter